The Creative Frame Rate research project centers around cinema presentation: cameras, projectors, and the implications this rapidly evolving technology will have on the art of cinema. Our focus is on the art of cinematography in what used to be called “The Photoplay.” In short: storytelling. Foundational to our approach is that, at its core, art is revelatory. Thus the very essence of art is choice, selection, perspective, a point of view. The artist “selects” a particular perspective to reveal, what Václav Havel described as a “revelatory insight” into some aspect of life. This is accomplished by “filtering” the audience view to provide that perspective. In film there are many, many filters devised to conjure those views and perspectives. 

Frame rate filters can be used for all manner of effects. In this project we're not fixated on simply high frame rates per se but "appropriate" frame rates, or to be precise, "Creative Frame Rates" (CFR). There will be many such frame rate filters, depending on the story to be told. Further, these frame rates may also vary, during a production, or even during a scene. It must be obvious to the film community that our art form isn't necessarily about a literal depiction of reality; but is essentially an insightful and nuanced interpretation of reality, and we are now gathering at our fingertips a plethora of new tools to expand that insight and interpretation.

 

Note: the following pages can be viewed with a normal monitor, however there is additional HFR content available to users with the appropriate hardware. If you have a 120 Hz monitor visit this page for more info on compatibility.

 

History of Variable Frame Rate

The early days of cinema before the 24 fps standard 

Understanding Frame Rate Artifacts

How flicker fusion, motion fusion and motion blur effect our perception of moving images

Pickfair Creative Frame Rate Research

Extracting various cinematic effects from high frame rate source material